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Part one: Privacy matters

In this three-part series, Jay speaks with attorneys across Porter Wright’s departments and practices about privacy and data security. Today’s podcast begins with Christina Hultsch who talks about the options available for European Union companies to transfer data.… Continue Reading

Consumer data breaches

What happens if your personally identifiable information is stolen, but no harm has come to you…yet? Do the eyes of the court feel that simply the fear of harm warrants relief? Jay and Ryan Graham discuss the differing decisions to date and how things may evolve in the future.… Continue Reading

Representative evidence – Good, bad? The Supreme Court speaks

As we’ve reported previously, Tyson was challenging the certification of a class of employees who sued for unpaid time related to donning and doffing protective gear. Jay discusses the implications of the Supreme Court’s allowance of representative evidence to prove classwide liability and how the Court’s ruling may (or may not) impact future class actions.… Continue Reading

Are data breaches covered under insurance policies?

In defending against a class action case where patient information was found online for months without being secured, the insurance company was found to have a duty to defend the defendant, who held an insurance policy that covered the publication of patient information. The case, Travelers Indemnity vs. Portal Healthcare, is important because it’s one … Continue Reading

Big data and what can be done with it: Part three

In our last installment of the big data podcast series (listen to part one and part two), Jay and Phil discuss how companies deal with data breaches. They talk about how consumer trust is vital and how customers may prepare in advance for these breaches. Finally, Phil shares three tips when it comes to using … Continue Reading

Big data and what can be done with it: Part two

Continuing their conversation regarding big data, Phil and Jay discuss what companies should be doing with big data, how to figure out whether they are using it correctly and if there is a better way of doing it. How do companies place value on their data to make financial decisions?… Continue Reading

Big data and what can be done with it: Part one

In part one of this three-part series, Jay talks with Phil Rist, executive vice president of Prosper Business Development, about how his company collects big data and utilizes it to detect trends that aid his clients in developing their strategic plans. Phil discusses how his company not only takes data available from the federal government, … Continue Reading

Health care data breaches – inevitable, but you can minimize the damage

Data breaches in health care can be the most devastating, both to the consumers whose personally identifiable information was exposed, but also to the institutions that possessed this sensitive data. In this podcast Jay and Christina Hultsch review the various issues surrounding such data breaches, including when to review data security policies, how to prepare … Continue Reading

Third Circuit’s Wyndham decision – Part one

In part one of this two part series, Jay is joined by Ryan Graham, a colleague at Porter Wright and former FBI analyst, to discuss the Third Circuit’s decision in FTC vs. Wyndham. Ryan and Jay discuss generally the various agencies who have authority over data security and the challenges facing companies who have experienced … Continue Reading

Government licensure for the personal training industry – unnecessary, unworkable and unintelligible

A campaign to require licensure in the personal training industry by the U.S. Registry of Exercise Professionals has left some scratching their heads. Six states have considered licensure laws that, through criminal liability, would forbid providing personal training services without a license. In 2013, Washington, D.C. passed legislation authorizing the D.C. Board of Physical Therapy … Continue Reading

Antitrust woes for Amazon, Part 2

Antitrust Law Source author Darcy Jalandoni and editor Jay Levine pick up their discussion of the antitrust issues facing Amazon. In this episode, they discuss the parties’ positions, the result of Amazon’s recent contract dispute with Hachette…and how authors, and ultimately how American literature, will publish in the future.… Continue Reading

Antitrust woes for Amazon, Part 1

Since the Kindle was released in 2007, Amazon has become dominant in the e-publishing world. Amid its other legal battles over the last eight years, a dispute between authors, the traditional publishing industry and Amazon has been not so quietly brewing. Antitrust Law Source author Darcy Jalandoni and editor Jay Levine discuss some of the … Continue Reading

“Made in the USA” labeling: A trap for the unwary – Part two

How can retailers and product designers minimize their liability exposure to “Made in the USA” false-labeling claims without sacrificing the valuable label itself? In part two of the “Made in the USA” podcast series, Jay Levine, Jared Klaus and Bob Tannous discuss how mitigating risk from such claims requires a holistic approach, including such strategies … Continue Reading

The importance of the state action exemption on state licensing boards

This podcast discusses the background and potential legal implications, particularly on state licensing boards, of North Carolina Board of Dental Examiners v. Federal Trade Commission, argued before the U.S. Supreme Court last month and previously summarized here. Jay Levine and Darcy Jalandoni, members of Porter Wright’s Antitrust Group, provide an overview of the state action … Continue Reading

Mergers 101 – So you have a deal, now what?

This podcast offers a brief introduction into the world of the Hart-Scott-Rodino Antitrust Improvement Act of 1976, more commonly referred to as the HSR Act. Two members of the Porter Wright Antitrust group, Jay Levine and Jetta Sandin, provide listeners with an overview of the history of the Act, the criteria that could make a … Continue Reading

Part Three: Section two of The Sherman Act – unilateral conduct (cont’d)

Rounding out our discussion on the Sherman Act, host Jay Levine discusses how businesses enter into contracts utilizing specific tactics to ensure they stay competitive and under what circumstances those tactics become problematic.  Learn how most favored nation and non-discrimination clauses, as well as market share discounts and exchanging non-price information can be used to … Continue Reading

Part One: Section two of The Sherman Act – Unilateral conduct

In this podcast, Jay Levine continues his discussion of the Sherman Act, focusing now on unilateral conduct. Jay talks through some of the details specific to Section Two of the Act. What is monopolization, what is considered an attempt of monopolization and what types of conduct should your business avoid so you can stay aggressively competitive … Continue Reading
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