Antitrust Law Source

Podcasts

Episode 46
The outlook for startups and emerging businesses

This year has been a year like no other.  In this episode, Jay talks to fellow partner Brett Thornton, chair of Porter Wright’s Energy, Biotech and Emerging Business practice group, about how deal work for emerging businesses has been affected by the pandemic, the elections and the possibility of changing antitrust rules.

Read a transcription of this episode here.

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Episode 45
COVID-19’s impact on the health care industry

COVID-19 has had an impact on virtually every industry in the country, but none more so than on health care. In this episode, Jay talks with John Carney, chair of Porter Wright’s Health Care Practice and former Ohio state representative, about the changes that COVID-19 has wrought on health care and on some changes the industry is likely to experience in the future.

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Episode 44
Ohio’s COVID-19 qualified immunity legislation

COVID-19 has spurred all sorts of legislation. In this episode, Jay discusses some examples of COVID-19-related legislation with John Carney, Chair of Porter Wright’s Health Care Practice and former three-term Ohio state representative. The discussion includes Ohio’s recently-enacted qualified immunity legislation (HB 606) as well as some thoughts about future laws that may be on the horizon on the federal level.

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Strict liability applies to “deceptive conduct” under the catch-all provision of the Pennsylvania CPL

A divided Pennsylvania Supreme Court affirmed the Superior Court and held that the 1996 amended catch-all provision of the Pennsylvania Trade Practices and Consumer Protection Law (CPL) imposes strict liability. Writing for the 4-3 majority, Justice David Wecht, based upon a professed review of the plain language of the statute, concluded the General Assembly’s addition of “or deceptive conduct” to the catch-all provision of the CPL dictated a lesser, more relaxed standard. Thus, the majority characterized that aspect of the statute as imposing strict liability.

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Competitive Health Insurance Reform Act repeals McCarran-Ferguson exemption for health insurers

For nearly 75 years, the McCarran-Ferguson Act established a broad – although not unlimited – exemption from the application of federal law to “the business of insurance,” finding “the continued regulation and taxation by the several states [of that business] in the public interest.” As a result, McCarran-Ferguson exempted insurers from federal antitrust liability where their activity in question (1) was part of the “business of insurance,” (2) was regulated by state law and (3) did not constitute a “boycott, coercion, or intimidation.” With the passage of the Competitive Health Insurance Reform Act (CHIRA) into law on Jan. 13, 2021 however, the activities of health insurers, by and large, are no longer exempt from the federal antitrust laws.

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Paycheck Protection Program loan necessity questionnaire

Borrowers of Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) loans – together with their affiliates – who have loans in excess of $2 million and seek loan forgiveness will potentially need to complete necessity questionnaires according to the Small Business Administration. There are separate forms for for-profit and non-profit businesses and will likely affect 52,000 borrowers.

My colleagues Jack Beeler, Cat Rice and Jack Meadows explain the purpose and questions asked in these questionnaires in this law alert.

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