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Podcasts

Episode 46
The outlook for startups and emerging businesses

This year has been a year like no other.  In this episode, Jay talks to fellow partner Brett Thornton, chair of Porter Wright’s Energy, Biotech and Emerging Business practice group, about how deal work for emerging businesses has been affected by the pandemic, the elections and the possibility of changing antitrust rules.

Read a transcription of this episode here.

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Episode 45
COVID-19’s impact on the health care industry

COVID-19 has had an impact on virtually every industry in the country, but none more so than on health care. In this episode, Jay talks with John Carney, chair of Porter Wright’s Health Care Practice and former Ohio state representative, about the changes that COVID-19 has wrought on health care and on some changes the industry is likely to experience in the future.

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Episode 44
Ohio’s COVID-19 qualified immunity legislation

COVID-19 has spurred all sorts of legislation. In this episode, Jay discusses some examples of COVID-19-related legislation with John Carney, Chair of Porter Wright’s Health Care Practice and former three-term Ohio state representative. The discussion includes Ohio’s recently-enacted qualified immunity legislation (HB 606) as well as some thoughts about future laws that may be on the horizon on the federal level.

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The antitrust revolution is coming? The antitrust revolution is here?

Borrowing from the immortal words of Paul Revere, the title consciously evokes images of a battle, though fought with words and ideas and (hopefully) not muskets and bayonets. The proper objectives of the antitrust laws and the appropriate level of antitrust enforcement has been discussed in mainstream media more over the last decade than perhaps at any point in time. Indeed, in both 2016 and 2020, the Democratic Party platform included a section on antitrust. Many non-lawyers may assume that the public discussions about antitrust are nothing more than the normal discourse attendant to political jockeying. And to some extent that may be correct. But there really is a more fundamental debate going on that hit at the heart and soul of antitrust. In fact, to a very real extent, the debate about antitrust mirrors the divide in social philosophy that underlies the political schism that exists today.

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Antitrust as antidote? Historical overview of antitrust law

An antitrust revolution is upon us. Numerous pundits and political leaders blame many of today’s societal and economic ills on what they claim is the increasing concentration of economic power in the hands of a few. Perceived lax antitrust enforcement and permissive antitrust laws, many claim, is the cause of that. Indeed, President Joe Biden has placed antitrust enforcement at the forefront of his administration and aims to use antitrust enforcement to remedy social inequities and restore democratic ideals. Continue Reading

Supreme Court clips FTC’s wings

In a significant decision handed down last Thursday, April 22, 2021, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) cannot, in the first instance, seek monetary remedies in federal court. Rather, it must first obtain a cease and desist order and, only after a violation of that order, can it seek penalties or other monetary relief, such as disgorgement.  Read on for why this should matter to you.

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Reevaluating your supply chain: How the new American-made product qualifications rule may impact your business

Two recent actions aimed at maximizing domestically-produced goods, products, materials and services may have significant impact on contractors and supply chains. In January 2021, the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) Council published a final rule “Maximizing Use of American-Made Goods, Products, and Materials” that amended the requirements for products to be classified as American-made under the Buy American Act (BAA). Less than a week later, President Joe Biden signed Executive Order 14005, titled “Ensuring the Future Is Made in All of America by All of America’s Workers,” to further strengthen the BAA requirements and close loopholes that allowed companies to engage in offshore production and manufacturing.

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