For nearly 75 years, the McCarran-Ferguson Act established a broad – although not unlimited – exemption from the application of federal law to “the business of insurance,” finding “the continued regulation and taxation by the several states [of that business] in the public interest.” As a result, McCarran-Ferguson exempted insurers from federal antitrust liability where their activity in question (1) was part of the “business of insurance,” (2) was regulated by state law and (3) did not constitute a “boycott, coercion, or intimidation.” With the passage of the Competitive Health Insurance Reform Act (CHIRA) into law on Jan. 13, 2021 …