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Archives: Privacy & Data Security

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DCMA agent requirements changing

Bob Morgan, our colleague at Technology Law Source, shares detail about the upcoming Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DCMA) agent filing change that takes effect Dec. 31. This agent filing is a necessary element of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) safe harbor provision (Title II of the DMCA (the Online Copyright Infringement Liability Limitation Act)) — an Act which … Continue Reading

Insights into the data analytics community

Jay is once again accompanied by Phil Rist, executive vice president of Prosper Business Development, to discuss how the data analytics community is growing, what’s needed to get into the business and how once separate industries are coming together to provide better customer experiences.… Continue Reading

FTC has ruled….and companies better beware!

In a move the surprised no one, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) reversed the decision of its own Administrative Law Judge (ALJ) and held that LabMD’s “data security practices constitute an unfair act or practice within the meaning of Section 5 of the FTC Act.” There are two noteworthy aspects to the opinion. First, if … Continue Reading

Part one: Privacy matters

In this three-part series, Jay speaks with attorneys across Porter Wright’s departments and practices about privacy and data security. Today’s podcast begins with Christina Hultsch who talks about the options available for European Union companies to transfer data.… Continue Reading

Consumer data breaches

What happens if your personally identifiable information is stolen, but no harm has come to you…yet? Do the eyes of the court feel that simply the fear of harm warrants relief? Jay and Ryan Graham discuss the differing decisions to date and how things may evolve in the future.… Continue Reading

Are data breaches covered under insurance policies?

In defending against a class action case where patient information was found online for months without being secured, the insurance company was found to have a duty to defend the defendant, who held an insurance policy that covered the publication of patient information. The case, Travelers Indemnity vs. Portal Healthcare, is important because it’s one … Continue Reading

Big data and what can be done with it: Part three

In our last installment of the big data podcast series (listen to part one and part two), Jay and Phil discuss how companies deal with data breaches. They talk about how consumer trust is vital and how customers may prepare in advance for these breaches. Finally, Phil shares three tips when it comes to using … Continue Reading

Big data and what can be done with it: Part two

Continuing their conversation regarding big data, Phil and Jay discuss what companies should be doing with big data, how to figure out whether they are using it correctly and if there is a better way of doing it. How do companies place value on their data to make financial decisions?… Continue Reading

Big data and what can be done with it: Part one

In part one of this three-part series, Jay talks with Phil Rist, executive vice president of Prosper Business Development, about how his company collects big data and utilizes it to detect trends that aid his clients in developing their strategic plans. Phil discusses how his company not only takes data available from the federal government, … Continue Reading

Health care data breaches – inevitable, but you can minimize the damage

Data breaches in health care can be the most devastating, both to the consumers whose personally identifiable information was exposed, but also to the institutions that possessed this sensitive data. In this podcast Jay and Christina Hultsch review the various issues surrounding such data breaches, including when to review data security policies, how to prepare … Continue Reading

FTC chief administrative law judge: No harm, no foul

In a long awaited decision, the FTC’s chief administrative law judge (ALJ) ruled against FTC staff and held that LabMD did not violate Section 5 of the FTC Act by not reasonably securing customer data. The basis for the decision was that staff could not prove that customers would suffer “substantial injury” from LabMD’s data … Continue Reading

Third Circuit’s Wyndham decision – Part one

In part one of this two part series, Jay is joined by Ryan Graham, a colleague at Porter Wright and former FBI analyst, to discuss the Third Circuit’s decision in FTC vs. Wyndham. Ryan and Jay discuss generally the various agencies who have authority over data security and the challenges facing companies who have experienced … Continue Reading

Third Circuit affirms FTC authority to sanction companies’ insufficient cyber security postures

The Third Circuit’s recent ruling in FTC v. Wyndham Worldwide Corp., No. 14-3514 (3rd Cir. Aug. 24, 2015) marks a watershed moment in the ongoing saga of Wyndham Worldwide Corporation’s (Wyndham) data breach litigation. Prior to this decision, federal cyber security regulation has existed in the legal badlands, with the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), the … Continue Reading

Managing post-data breach litigation just got harder

Data breaches are messy stuff, no doubt about that. They consume a huge amount of corporate resources, damage a company’s goodwill and can cost a lot of money. No real news there. And while the technological challenges in preventing, and responding to, data breaches are ever-changing – fueling the booming cybersecurity industry – the corporate … Continue Reading

Ascertainability is different from other class action elements …seriously, we aren’t joking

A little over a year ago we wrote to discuss the FTC’s Order against Aaron’s, one of the country’s largest rent-to-own (“RTO”) stores, charging that its franchisees were spying on its customers.  Well, the inevitable follow-on class actions were filed and recently, in Byrd v. Aaron’s Inc., — F.3d –, 2015 U.S. App. LEXIS 6190 … Continue Reading
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